Submissions/I'm Sorry About What I Did in 2006: When You Shouldn't Assume Good Faith When Editing Wikipedia

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Info

This is an Open submission for Wikimania 2017 that has not yet been reviewed by a member of the Programme Committee.


Submission no. L0012
Title of your submission
I'm Sorry About What I Did in 2006: When You Shouldn't Assume Good Faith When Editing Wikipedia
Type of submission 

Lightning talk

Author of the submission
Gamaliel
Language of presentation
English
E-mail address
wikigamaliel@gmail.com
Username
Gamaliel
Country of origin
United States
Affiliation, if any (organisation, company etc.)
Wikimedia District of Columbia
Personal homepage or blog
http://wikimediadc.org/
Abstract (up to 300 words to describe your proposal)
Assume Good Faith is a cornerstone of Wikipedia. It is an essential principle, but in practice it has been extended too far to cover situations and edits that should be treated with a more robust skepticism. This talk will argue that the principle "trust, but verify" should be used to supplement the extension of good faith. Employing this principle can prevent edits that diminish the quality and accuracy of the encyclopedia, and this will be illustrated by examples including a couple notorious Wikipedia hoaxes, as well as dumb edits by the speaker himself.
What will attendees take away from this session?
Attendees will be encouraged to adopt a healthy, respectful skepticism when approaching examining and verifying edits by others.
Theme of presentation
  • WikiCulture & Community


Length of submission

All lightning talks are 5 minutes.

Will you attend Wikimania if your submission is not accepted?
Yes
Slides or further information (optional)
There will be some slides
Special requests
none
Is this Submission a Draft or Final? Final

Interested attendees

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